Speakers New York, NY


Carl Anthony is Acting Director of the Community and Resource Development Unit at the Ford Foundation and directs the Foundation's Sustainable Metropolitan Communities Initiative and the Regional Equity Demonstration Initiative. Prior to joining the Foundation he was a Convener and Co-Chair of the Bay Area Alliance for Sustainable Development (BAASD). BAASD is a multi stake holder collaborative bringing together business leadership, environmental groups, social advocacy groups, labor, faith based organizations, elected and other public officials to build a consensus on how the region of 6.5 million, and over 100 jurisdictions, should grow. He was Founder and was for 12 years, Executive Director of the Urban Habitat Program. The mission of Urban Habitat is to promote multicultural urban environmental leadership for sustainable, socially just communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. With a colleague, Luke Cole at the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, he published and edited the Race, Poverty and Environment Journal, the only environmental justice periodical in the country.

From 1991 through 1997, Anthony served as President of Earth Island Institute, an international environmental organization to protect and conserve the global biosphere. Congressman Ron Dellums appointed Carl Anthony Chair and Principal Administrative Officer of the East Bay Conversion and Reinvestment Commission in 1993. The Commission was charged with overseeing a National Pilot Project to guide the closure of 500 military bases in the US, to re-envision the role of the National Laboratories, and to implement the conversion of 5 military bases in Alameda County. He has taught at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture and Planning, the University of California College of Environmental Design and Natural Resources. He has been an Advisor to the Stanford University Law School on issues of environmental justice. Anthony has a professional degree in architecture from Columbia University. In 1996, he was appointed Fellow at the Institute of Politics, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.


J. Max Bond Jr. FAIA is recognized internationally as one of the United States' leading architects and educators. Max won early recognition for the design of the Bolgatanga Library in Ghana, and has followed that with such projects as the Birmingham Civil Rights Museum, The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, Georgia and major research laboratories at Harvard, Columbia and Northwestern Universities. In addition to recognition for award-winning architecture, Mr. Bond has established a reputation as a designer who works closely with his clients and their local communities to understand their needs and project goals.

Early in his career, Max Bond lived and worked in France and Ghana. Upon returning to the United States, Max helped establish and became executive director of the Architects Renewal Committee of Harlem (ARCH), one of the early community design centers that developed during the late 1960s and early 1970s. After two years with ARCH, he co-founded Bond Ryder and Associates which quickly became one of the leading African-American architecture firms in New York and the East Coast. He was Commissioner of the New York City Planning Commission from 1980-1986, and professor of the architecture programs of Columbia University and City College of New York. Mr. Bond merged his firm with Davis Brody & Associates in 1990 and has since served as Partner-in-Charge of many of the firm's significant academic and institutional projects.


Kofi Boone is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and co-director of Ghana Study Abroad at North Carolina State University. His expertise is urban design, participatory design and the design of public spaces. His research interest is the role of Landscape Architecture in the Environmental Justice Movement. Prior to joining NC State, Kofi was a designer for nine years at Smith Group JJR. While there, he led design and planning projects ranging form neighborhood parks and downtown spaces, to city and regional plans. Project investigations ranged from regional to local issues, and made connections between natural and cultural phenomenon.

Kofi has presented at The Society for American City and Regional Planning History, The Sites of Memory Symposium (University of Virginia), and many other conferences. He has served on numerous juries, charities and community assistance projects, including an AIA Urban Design Assistance Team in Randallstown, Maryland.

In 2004, Kofi received a grant from The Africa Project to develop an interdisciplinary urban design studio in collaboration with Kwame Nkurmah University in Kumasi, Ghana. Kofi's education includes Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources, University of Michigan.


David Brown is an Associate Professor of Architecture at University of Illinois at Chicago. He is co-editor of two publications, "Row: Trajectories Through the Shotgun House," a forthcoming Architecture at Rice publication supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Built Surface, a workshop catalog supported by a Graham Foundation Grant that document symposiums he co-organized while teaching at Rice University and Florida A&M University,. He received his undergraduate degree in art history from Brown University and his Masters of Architecture from University of California, Berkeley.

Mr. Brown received a McKnight Junior Faculty Fellowship while teaching at Florida A&M. Some of his past efforts related to this research are found in the publications 16 Houses: Designing the Public's Private House and Sites of Memory: Perspectives on Architecture and Race.


Elise M. Bright, Ph.D. is Professor and Coordinator of the Master of Urban Planning Program at Texas A&M University. Before coming to A&M, she taught at the University of Texas at Arlington for 17 years. She completed her undergraduate work at the University of Arizona magna cum laude with a double major in Spanish and government, and joined the Arizona welfare department as a social worker. Dr. Bright holds a Master in City Planning degree from Harvard, and a Doctor of Environmental Design degree from Texas A&M.

She held several planning positions and consulted throughout the United States for 12 years before joining academia. For the past decade she conducted extensive research for the National Center for Central City Revitalization, visiting revitalized low income neighborhoods throughout the country and speaking with neighborhood organizers, funders and residents. Her book chronicling this effort, Reviving America's Forgotten Neighborhoods (Routledge/Taylor and Francis, New York, 2000; paperback 2002), won the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning's Paul Davidoff Award for Best Book on Social Justice. Her current research focuses on the effects of the over appraisal on property tax in low income neighborhoods, and the importance of regional containment to the health of the central city, and has lectured on these issues at symposia in Washington, London, Beijing, Ukraine, and elsewhere. Bright's other areas of expertise include economic development, zoning, and environmental planning/impact assessment.


Dalton Conley is professor of Sociology and Public Policy at New York University and Director of NYU's Center for Advanced Social Science Research (CASSR). He is also Adjunct Professor of Community Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He has taught at Yale and Princeton as well.

His scholarly research focuses on how socio-economic status is transmitted across generations and the public policies that affect that process. In this vein, he studies siblings differences in socioeconomic success, racial inequalities, the measurement of class and social status, and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position.

Conley is author of Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth and Social Policy in America (winner of the American Sociological Association 1997 Dissertation Award), Honky, a sociological memoir, and The Starting Gate: Birth Weight and Life Chances (with Kate Strully and Neil G. Bennett). His latest book is, The Pecking Order: Which Siblings Succeed and Why (Pantheon Books, 2/2004).

He has received a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award and a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation. In addition to academic journals, Conley is a frequent contributor to mainstream media, including The New York Times, Forbes, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, Slate, Le Monde Diplomatique and various other trade publications.


Mindy Thompson Fullilove, M.D. is a research psychiatrist at New York State Psychiatric Institute and a professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. She was educated at Bryn Mawr College (AB, 1971) and Columbia University ( MS, 1971;MD 1978) She is a board certified psychiatrist, having received her training at New York Hospital- Westchester Division ( 1978- 1981) and Monteforte Hospital ( 1981-1982).

After several years of work as a community psychiatrist, Dr. Fullilove joined the UCSF Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at its founding in 1986. Most recently, with support of a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Investigator Award, she has studied the long-term consequences of urban renewal for African-American people. As part of that work, she co- founded NYC RECOVERS, an alliance of organizations concerned with the social and emotional recovery of New York City in the aftermath of 9/11. This project provided the data for her book, Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It, (June 2004 Ballantine Books). Along with her recent book, she has published numerous articles book chapters and monographs. Her achievements include being named a "National Associate" by the National Academy of Science in 2003, and receiving two honorary doctorates (Chatham College and Bank Street College of Education.)


Maxine Griffith holds the dual position of Executive Director of the Philadelphia City Planning Commission and Secretary for Strategic Planning. In these roles, she oversees land use planning, zoning, environmental review, urban design, and capital budget coordination for America's 5th largest city, and coordinates planning functions throughout city government. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the Lincoln Foundation, the Architectural League of New York, and the Design Trust for Public Space, the Philadelphia Avenue of the Arts, and SEEDS and is a member of the Advisory Board for the Center City Proprietors Association. She was a Senior Fellow for Community Planning and Development at the Regional Plan Association (NY), HUD Secretary's Representative for NY/NJ, Assistant Deputy Secretary (Washington, DC) and New York City Planning Commissioner.

She was principal of the Griffith Planning & Design firm, and held positions as Executive Director of the Neighborhood Design Center of Oakland (California), Director of Planning, Land Use and Development for the Manhattan Borough President and Deputy Director of Housing and Community Development for the New York Department of Planning, and was an Architectural Designer for the award-winning firm of Hardy Holtzman Phieffer. From 1996-2000, she served on the national board of the American Planning Association and she is presently a member of the Planning Accreditation Board, the organization that accredits schools of planning in the US.

Maxine Griffith received a BA, cum laude, from Hunter College in New York and a Master of Architecture Degree from UC Berkeley. She has completed coursework in Urban Planning, and Real Property Development at Harvard University


James B. Hyman, Ph.D. is a social scientist with thirty years of executive-level experience grappling with issues of persistent poverty and urban policy. Over the past ten years he has devoted his energies to expanding the fields of economic development, youth development, community development, and prisoner reentry.

He has explored these pursuits from a variety of posts. He has experience in philanthropy - as President of the Freddie Mac Foundation; as Associate Director of the Annie E. Casey Foundation; and as Program Officer at the Cleveland Foundation. He has experience with administering a government service program as a President of the Cleveland and Cuyahoga Private Industry Council. He has had senior policy research experience as a Visiting Fellow at the Urban Institute and an Associate Social Scientist at the Rand Corporation. And he has experience in senior government service as Special Assistant to the Deputy Undersecretary to the Department of Education.

In 1996, Dr. Hyman started his consulting firm, James B. Hyman, Ph.D., Inc. as a vehicle for deploying the synergies of his diverse interests and experiences. Recent clients have included among others the Kellogg and Annie E Casey Foundations, The World Bank, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Dr. Hyman has written several papers, journal articles and books stemming from his work with and support from clients such as, Men And Communities: African-American Males And The Well-Being Of Children, Families And Neighborhoods (The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore) and Building the Village: Exploring Social Capital as the Vehicle for Strengthening Resiliency in Youth (Report to the William T. Grant Foundation, New York, NY).


Zevilla Jackson Preston, born and raised in the Harlem community, is principal of J - P Design Group, Inc., a Harlem based architectural firm, and founder of The African American Architects Roundtable for Entrepreneurs. A graduate of the City College of New York School of Architecture, Ms. Jackson Preston has taught design studio at CCNY and has been recognized as a Woman of Excellence. Further, The City University of New York has included her in its publication The Best and Brightest of CUNY.

Ms. Jackson Preston began her career in 1990 working for various New York based architectural firms. As the Principal of J-P Design she has gained a reputation for the creative design and innovative design work.

A life long Harlem resident, Zevilla Jackson Preston understands the social and economic issues that are key factors in exploring the physical space and believes in sustainable community development that recognizes the interconnection of the social, physical, and cultural vitality of a community. As an architect, Ms. Jackson Preston is committed to the quality of the built environment by creating distinctly unique spaces.


Danilo Pelletrie Ph.D. is the National Research Director of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. He is responsible for directing the Low Income Housing Coalition's data analysis, public opinion, and rapid response research efforts. He is the author and co-author of a number of academic articles and book chapters, and profession reports focusing on transportation, economic development and housing policy including the Coalition's Annual Out of Reach report, one of the most cited sources on local housing cost in the U.S.

Dr. Pelletrie has previously held positions at George Mason University, World Resources Institute, Virginia's Center for Innovative Technology, and the National Association of State Development Agencies. As a volunteer leader on local economic development and environmental issues, most prominently with the Sierra Club's "Restore the Core" campaign, he has sought to highlight the opportunities and challenges of redirecting development and population to urban areas in the Washington D.C. region as a means of combating sprawl. In this role, he was instrumental in publishing two guides to development in Washington, Movin' On Up, Not Out: Redeveloping Our Neighborhoods to Benefit Current Residents and Restore the Core: A Citizen's Guide to Building a Livable Washington, D.C.

He received his Ph.D. in Public Policy from George Mason University, where he continues to teach and study as a Senior Fellow at the School of Public Policy. In 1994-1995 he was a Fulbright scholar in the field of economic development in Rostock, Germany.


Karen A. Phillips was appointed as a Commissioner of the New York City Planning Commission in 2002, and now provides community development and planning consulting services around the country. She was also the 2002-2003 Mid-Career Community Development Fellow of the Milano Graduate School of Management and Urban Policy at the New School University following her 13-year tenure at Abyssinian Development Corporation (ADC). ADC was initiated by Abyssinian Baptist Church to assist in the redevelopment of Harlem. Ms. Phillips became the first employee, then President and Chief Executive Officer, leading the organization to its development into a national model for comprehensive community economic development. By 2002, ADC had invested almost $200 million in the Harlem community, created over 1,000 units of housing for various income levels, fostered proposals for the redevelopment of four large properties that contain over a half million space feet of commercial space and employed 55 people with a consolidated budget of $7.5 million.

Ms. Phillips was initially trained as a landscape architect at the University of Georgia School of Environmental Design, and graduated from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, with a concentration in real estate development and urban planning. In addition to Board membership in several community, civic and arts organizations, she also serves on the North East Regional Office of Fannie Mae Housing and Community Development Advisory Board, the State Farm Bank National Community Reinvestment Act Advisory Board, and the Executive Committee of New York 2050, a participatory visioning process for the region. She is a Fellow in the American Society of Landscape Architects, was selected as one of the 100 noted graduates at Harvard's celebration of 100 years of Landscape Architecture, and in the fall of 2004 was named by Real Estate Weekly as one of the top "100 Women in NYC Real Estate".


Shawn L. Rickenbacker is a young innovative architect who has been widely recognized for his designs, concepts and art installation in New York City, nationally and internationally. Currently he is partner, creative director of Creative Front, a design agency based in New York specializing in architecture, interiors and product design. Shawn brings to his firm the extensive experience from firms such as Ehrankrantz and Eckstut Architects and Polshek Partnership. He as been featured in publications and exhibits for his works in the Harlem World Exhibit in 2004 at the Studio Museum in Harlem, for residential housing design, as well as artistic and exhibition gallery design.

A frequent lecturer at design schools across the nation and in several countries, Shawn has lectured and made presentations at Washington University, the University of Virginia, Prairie View State University, University of Illinois - Champagne/Urbana as well as Barcelona, Helsinki and Havana. Shawn was assistant professor of architecture and design at Ohio State University and University of Virginia and has been an invited juror at Yale, Pennsylvania, Cornell, Rice, Georgia Tech and University of Michigan. In 1990 he received a Bachelors of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and went on to the University of Virginia where he earned a Masters of Architecture Degree with a Certificate in Urbanism. In graduate school he was awarded and the Dupont Scholarship and a finalist in Carlo Pellichia traveling fellowship.


Jonathan F.P. Rose is President of Jonathan Rose Companies LLC, a network of community and land use planning and development firms that collaborate with cities and towns, and not-for-profits to repair the fabric of urban and rural communities. Mr. Rose is an innovator in bringing together solutions to planning community development, finance, culture, and land preservation. He is a leading thinker in the Smart Growth and green building movements, and a frequent speaker on these subjects.

Rose also serves as Chairman of the Executive Committee of Jazz at the Lincoln Center and was responsible for the design and construction of its new home, Frederick P. Rose Hall. Along with his wife, Diana, he co-founded the Garrison Institute (global NGO, connecting contemplation with social and environmental action). He also serves on the Boards of the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Enterprise Foundation, and the Greyston Foundation (Chair 1994-2004), an innovative entrepreneurial community development organization that has been revitalizing Yonkers, New York. Other boards on which Mr. Rose serves include the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Real Estate Advisory Board of the Trust for Public Land, and the Leadership Council of Yale University's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

Numerous awards have been attributed to Jonathan Rose including; the UN Corporate Best Practices award, an honor award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Natural Resources Defense Council's "Force of Nature" award, the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association's Green Building Award, the Open Space Institute's Land Conservation Award, and the AIA New York chapter and NY Foundation for Architecture- 2002 Design Award.


Anthony W. Schuman is a registered architect and associate professor at the New Jersey School of Architecture, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), where he presently serves as Acting Dean and Acting Graduate Program Director. He is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), which represents the 125 accredited schools of architecture in the U.S. and Canada. His articles on housing design and community development appear in ten books and numerous scholarly journals and conference proceedings. His writing has received awards from ACSA and the Society for American City and Regional Planning History. Tony was a founding member of a series of advocacy and activist organizations in the architecture and planning professions, including Urban Deadline, The Architects' Resistance (TAR), Homefront, and the Planners Network. He is past chair of the New York Chapter of Architects /Designers /Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR).


Ron Shiffman is a city planner with 37 years of experience and is currently a Professor at Pratt Institute School of Architecture. Most recently he directed a series of important discussions on urban design and affordable housing, supported by the Ford Foundation. Trained as an architect and urban planner, he has had extensive experience bringing together private and public sector sponsors of housing and related community development projects. In 1964, Ron Shiffman co-founded the Pratt Institute Center for Community and Environmental Development [PICCED].
Former chair at Pratt Institute's School of Architecture Department of City and Regional Planning from 1991 to 1999, Shiffman has taught and developed courses on urban and community planning, participatory planning, sustainable development and the history and philosophy of community development. He has served as a consultant to HUD, the USAID and the Ford Foundation on national and global community-based initiatives and he has served on a number of gubernatorial and mayoral task forces. Professor Shiffman was a mayoral appointee to the New York City Planning Commission from 1990 to 1996.


Roy Strickland is director of the Master of Urban Design Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, were he also directs the New American School Design Project [NASDP]. He began NASDP, a multi-disciplinary design and research project that correlates the design of school facilities with the discussion of American School reform, while a member of the faculty of the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His skills for improving the quality of education have been applied in the creation of plans for schools in Trenton, Patterson and Union City, NJ, Washington, D. C and Berkeley, CA. His book Designing Places for Learning: Patterson, NJ presents concepts for using public school capital projects as tools for revitalizing a post-industrial American City. He has maintained his private practice and was former director of the Urban Design Program at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture.

In 2002, he received the EDRA Place Award and has been previously honored with the M IT Council on the Arts Award, Municipal Art Society Merit Award for Bryant Park Project in New York City, and the Architectural League of New York - Young Architects Award. He has contributed to numerous publications and his work has been widely exhibited across the country. Roy holds a B.A. from Columbia University and a Masters of Architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Beverly Willis, FAIA, is President of the Architecture Research Institute and the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation. She began her career as a multi-media artist, became a licensed architect in 1966, and was honored with a Fellowship by the American Institute of Architects in 1980. Her 35-person firm, Willis and Associates, Inc., has planned and designed projects located across the US. Her best-known building is the San Francisco Ballet Association Building and School in the San Francisco Civic Center. She founded the Architecture Research Institute in Manhattan in 1994 and closed her San Francisco based firm when she moved to New York. She was a Dartmouth College Montgomery Fellow in 1992 while she was writing her book Invisible Images - The Silent Language of Architecture, (National Building Museum, 1997). Her most recent papers include Towards a Sustainable City: Rebuilding Lower Manhattan in the book Future Forms and Design for Sustainable Cities, (Elsevier, Ltd. Oxford, 2005), and Towards a Sustainable City in the book City and Gender: International Discourse on Gender, Urbanism and Architecture, Leske+Budrich, Hanover, Germany 2003). She is a founding Trustee of the National Building Museum, Washington, DC. She is a past president of California Council American Institute of Architects, Golden Gate Chapter of Lambda Alpha and Chair of the Federal Construction Council, National Academy of Science, Washington, DC. Willis graduated from the University of Hawaii with a BFA degree in 1954. Mount Holyoke College awarded her an honorary doctorate in Fine Arts in 1984.


Speakers Oakland, CA


Kevin D. Arnold, Ph.D., A.B.P.P. is a psychologist, licensed in Ohio and Wisconsin, specializing in behavioral and cognitive-behavioral interventions. He has served in the past as the Director of the Great Lakes Area Regional Center for Deafblind Education and as a consultant through the Great Lakes Area Regional Resource Center to the state offices for special education in Illinois, Wisconsin, and Ohio. Dr. Arnold has specialized in the assessment of cognitive functioning and interventions, originally through his work during his post-doctoral training and later through on-going continuing education and experience. He has authored several articles and chapters for practitioners on assessment, therapy, and ethics, and most recently published the Integrated Functional Behavior Assessment Protocol, a behavioral assessment manual. He currently serves as a member of the Ohio Board of Psychology, the Vice-President of the American Board of Behavioral Psychology, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at The Ohio State University, Chair of the Academic Training Committee of the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy, Chair of the Behavioral Psychology Specialty Committee, Director of The Center for Cognitive & Behavioral Therapy of Greater Columbus, Inc., and as Secretary of the Board of Governors for the Hannah Neil Foundation. In the past he has served as an Assistant Professor of Educational Administration at The Ohio State University, President and Finance Chair of the Ohio Psychological Association, President of the American Academy of Behavioral Psychology, and research consultant to the University of Dayton Research Projects office. His research interests have more recently turned toward issues of childhood literacy, cognitive and academic fluency in learning disabilities and ADHD, and the public health risk of hostile, conflicted divorce.


Teddy Cruz, native of Guatemala City, Guatemala, is principal of eStudio, and faculty member at Woodbury University's School of Architecture in San Diego, California. He is an architectural graduate of Cal Polytechnic University in San Luis Obispo, and also holds a masters degree from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Mr. Cruz received a Rome Prize for studies at the American Academy in Rome, and has gained national reputation for his low income housing designs. He is adept at turning overlooked and unused space within a dense, urban neighborhood into a live-able, workable environment.

Over the past decade, Cruz has demonstrated a deep commitment to developing architectural and urban solutions for global political and social problems that proliferate in international border zones. Taking his theoretical frame of reference as a starting point, Cruz has pursued investigations that stimulate an unconventional practice addressing the future of 'divided' cities and the larger phenomenon of border zones. Cruz's "Border Postcards" project develops new perspectives on urban planning and design in the international border zone that spans the metropolitan areas of San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Mexico.


Denise Fairchild, Ph.D. is a leader in the community economic development field in the City of Los Angeles and is recognized nationally for her innovative programs. She has dedicated over 30 years of her life to strengthening housing, jobs, businesses and economic opportunities for low-income residents and communities domestically and internationally. As the L.A. LISC Director for 6 years, Dr. Fairchild is credited with raising over 100 million dollars in equity, loans and grants that helped to finance over 2500 units of non-profit housing and 250,000 sq, ft. of commercial space.

Currently, she is the founder and director of the Community Development Technologies Center, a non-profit community development training, research and technical assistance organization using a variety of assets and capacity building strategies. Dr. Fairchild also is training others to carry on her life's passion. In 1995 she established the first and only Community College level community development training center in the country at LA Trade-Tech College. She has built a faculty, staff and curriculum that trains close to 500 grassroots leaders a year in organizing, community development techniques and mortgage finance. Finally, she also finds time to volunteer her expertise to numerous community boards and advocacy organizations.


Walter J. Hood received an undergraduate degree in landscape architecture from North Carolina State University and a Masters in Landscape Planning and Architecture at the University of California, Berkley. He is currently an associate professor of the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. Hood has been a visiting and a resident instructor in urban design at the International Laboratory of Architecture and Urban Design in Italy.

Hood's published works include "Urban Diaries" by Spacemaker Press, "Strengthening Neighborhoods Through Stream Restoration" by the MIT Press, and "African American Gardens: The Transference of Cultural Patterns and Practices from the Educators in Landscape Architecture.

A practicing professional, Mr. Hood is the Director of Hood Design, Inc of Oakland, California. The firm's urban landscapes and site architecture work include the Yerba Buena Connector Project; the Macon, Georgia, Poplar Street Civic Project; the Oakland, California, Lafayette Square Park Master Plan; the City of Oakland State Building competition with Fentress Associates; and the Thousand Oaks Elementary School and the MacDonald Residence with Stanley Saitowitz Associates, Architects.


R. Thomas Jones has been Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, since 2003. The College is the only one in the nation offering professional degrees in the five main disciplines that shape the built environment: City and Regional Planning, Architecture, Architectural Engineering, Landscape Architecture, and Construction Management.

His prior career includes 33 years of private, non-profit, and governmental practice in architecture, planning, and land use policy, primarily in the San Francisco Bay Area. Over that period, he has designed or developed over 800 units of affordable housing, and co-authored the award winning book "Good Neighbors, Affordable Family Housing".

Before coming to Cal Poly, he was the Executive Director of the California Futures Network, a smart growth policy reform coalition active in the state legislature, and a HUD Community Builder in San Francisco. His housing and community development expertise was honed over an eleven-year period when he served as Director for Community Planning and Development and Director of Architecture for the San Francisco and Oakland based non-profit Asian Neighborhood Design (AND). He also served as the Special Projects Director for the Mayor's Office of Housing in San Francisco from l988-1992.

Tom's career has been focused on architecture and community planning in disadvantaged communities. His work has garnered awards and recognition from the California Council of the AIA, HUD, the American Planning Association, Progressive Architecture, Architectural Record, and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Fannie Mae Foundation. A frequent presenter at state and national conferences on housing, planning, and community development, he was named Architect of the Year by San Francisco Magazine in 1998. He is currently on the Board of Directors for the Central Coast Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.


Michael Mendez is the Lead Consultant to the California State Assembly Select Committee on Environmental Justice. He has developed legislation relating to brownfields, environmental justice, urban landfills, pesticide use, public participation, waste diversion and recycling, school joint use projects, and is the principal advisor Assembly Member Cindy Montañez on Urban Development and Environmental Policy issues. Currently he staffs the Assembly member on the Budget Sub Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Protection, and the Legislative Latino Caucus.

A fourth generation Californian and child of an immigrant, Michael Mendez received his Bachelor's Degree in Urban Planning and Environmental Analysis form California State University at Northridge, and a Master's in City Planning from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), specializing in Environmental Policy, Housing, Community and Economic Development. Prior to attending MIT, Mr. Mendez worked for Latino Issues Forum (a public policy and advocacy institute in San Francisco), the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the City of Los Angeles Department Neighborhood Empowerment. Michael has spoken and written extensively on the interactions between Latino demographics, housing needs, environmental impact and development patterns. Mr. Mendez also serves on the Alumni Council for the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at California State University, Northridge and the MIT Program in Human Rights & Justice Alumni Advisory Group.


Karen A. Phillips was appointed as a Commissioner of the New York City Planning Commission in 2002, and now provides community development and planning consulting services around the country. She was also the 2002-2003 Mid-Career Community Development Fellow of the Milano Graduate School of Management and Urban Policy at the New School University following her 13-year tenure at Abyssinian Development Corporation (ADC). ADC was initiated by Abyssinian Baptist Church to assist in the redevelopment of Harlem. Ms. Phillips became the first employee, then President and Chief Executive Officer, leading the organization to its development into a national model for comprehensive community economic development. By 2002, ADC had invested almost $200 million in the Harlem community, created over 1,000 units of housing for various income levels, fostered proposals for the redevelopment of four large properties that contain over a half million space feet of commercial space and employed 55 people with a consolidated budget of $7.5 million.

Ms. Phillips was initially trained as a landscape architect at the University of Georgia School of Environmental Design and graduated from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, with a concentration in real estate development and urban planning. In addition to Board membership in several community, civic and arts organizations, she also serves on the North East Regional Office of Fannie Mae Housing and Community Development Advisory Board, the State Farm Bank National Community Reinvestment Act Advisory Board, and the Executive Committee of New York 2050, a participatory visioning process for the region. She is a Fellow in the American Society of Landscape Architects, was selected as one of the 100 noted graduates at Harvard's celebration of 100 years of Landscape Architecture, and in the fall of 2004 was named by Real Estate Weekly as one of the top "100 Women in NYC Real Estate".


Michael Pyatok FAIA is a Professor at the University of Washington, and Principal of his own architectural firm since 1985. Professor Michael Pyatok's work focuses on non-profit and for-profit housing development throughout the United States. Professor Pyatok has won numerous design awards, among them several national housing design competitions, most recently two by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for Innovative Design for Home Ownership. He specializes in the design of community facilities and multi-family housing, including low-density suburban as well as high-density, inner-city, mixed-use developments. He is co-author of Good Neighbors: The Design of Affordable Family Housing (1996).

Appointed Loeb Fellow by Harvard University in 1983, he researched real estate development strategies by non-profit corporations using government assistance. As a Fulbright Fellow in 1969, he studied housing and urban design policies of Finland. Professor Pyatok has 33 years of teaching experience, and he has been a tenured professor at the University of Washington since 1990. He has B.A Architecture with honors from Pratt Institute and a Masters of Architecture with honors from Harvard University.

His professional alliances include service on the Board of Directors of the East Bay Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, where he chaired its Housing Committee; membership in Architects, Designers, and Planners for Social Responsibility, and a member of the National Coalition for the Homeless and the National Low Income Housing Coalition. He was elected into the College of Fellows of the AIA in recognition of the quality of design he has brought to affordable housing in lower income communities.


James Rosenbaum Ph.D. serves as Professor of Sociology, Education and Social Policy, and also Faculty Fellow, Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. For the past two decades, James Rosenbaum has conducted an extensive research project on the effects of relocating poor inner-city black families in public housing to subsidized housing in the white middle-class suburbs of Chicago. These studies encouraged the federal government to create its Moving to Opportunity (MTO) program, now being implemented by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, to which he serves as a consultant.

Rosenbaum's second major area of research concerns the high school to work transition and linkages among students, schools, and employers. He currently is focusing on the ties between employers and community colleges. Rosenbaum has testified before Congressional committees on several occasions. He serves as an adviser to the U.S. Office of Educational Research and Improvement. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the W.T. Grant Foundation's Commission on Youth and America's Future. Dr. Rosenbaum holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University.


Victor Rubin is Director of Research with PolicyLink, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing policies for social and economic equity. A member of the senior management team, he coordinates a wide range of knowledge-building activities linked to action, from literature reviews and surveys of practitioners to analyses of urban policies.

He joined PolicyLink after serving as director of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Office of University Partnerships, where he was responsible for the development of new programs, initiatives, and publications. There he administered a $23 million annual budget for grants to institutions of higher education for local partnerships and support of students in community development fields. Before joining HUD for a one-year appointment, Rubin served for 13 years as Director of Research and Community Programs of the University-Oakland Metropolitan Forum, a partnership based at the University of California, Berkeley's Institute of Urban and Regional Development. Rubin has served for five years as a principal analyst in the firm of Berkeley Planning Associates, providing policy research and program evaluation in the areas of child care, youth development, and employment training, through numerous contracts with state, federal and local agencies.

He earned a Ph.D. in 1986, from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California-Berkeley, and a M.C.P. eleven years prior. His Bachelor of Arts degree was in Public Affairs at the University of Chicago, in 1973. He is the author of articles in numerous journals for scholars and practitioners, including the Journal of Planning Education and Research, the Urban and Social Change Review and the Children's Advocate. His book, Career Academies: A Pathway for Educational Reform in Urban High Schools?, co-authored with Nan L. Maxwell, was released by the W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in November 2000.


Scott Ruff is originally from Buffalo, New York, and received both a bachelor of architecture degree and master of architecture degree from Cornell University. In 1992 he received the Alpha Rho Chi medal for leadership and service. He gained professional experience as an architect for Foit-Albert and Associates.

Prior to joining the Syracuse State University of New York School of Architecture faculty, Ruff taught at the Hampton University Department of Architecture, the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, and the Cornell University School of Architecture, Art and Planning. He has been an invited juror at the University of Virginia and the University of Michigan. In 2003, Ruff formed Ruff Works Studio, a research/design studio. One of the main subjects of inquiry for Ruff and the studio is the research and cultivation of African-American aesthetics in spatial design.

Ruff's published writings include an article in Thresholds, "Spatial "wRapping": A Speculation on Men's Hip-Hop Fashion", a book review in the Journal of Architectural Education on "White Papers, Black Marks". Ruff has lectured throughout the United States; recent presentations include "Secrets of the Cloth", "Education of an Architect: Through African-American Constructs" and "Diversity and Architecture."


William A. Satariano, Ph.D., MPH currently serves as Director of the Health and Social Behavior Program in the School of Public Health at the University of California at Berkeley and Professor of Epidemiology and Community Health. He was the former Deputy Director of the Division of Epidemiology and the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System at the Michigan Cancer Foundation from 1980-89. His research interests include the epidemiology of aging and disability, functional assessment, cancer rehabilitation and survival, physical activity and health in older populations, and the effects of the built environment on health and functioning. In addition to serving as principal investigator for a number of epidemiological studies funded by the National Institute on Aging, National Cancer Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society, he is currently serving as a co-investigator on an NIA-funded study of the epidemiology of aging and physical performance among residents aged 55 and older in Sonoma, California.

In 1999, Professor Satariano served as a Fulbright Scholar ("Aging, Health, and Functioning") at the National Center for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) in the Netherlands. In addition to service on the editorial board of the Journal of Aging and Health, he is completing a book, The Epidemiology of Aging: an Ecological Approach, to be published in 2005 by Jones and Bartlett. He has served as an advisor and consultant to a variety of organizations, including the State of California, National Institute on Aging, and the National Cancer Institute. Most recently, he has served as a member of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Active for Life Program, a national, community-based program to enhance physical activity in older populations. Dr. Samarian is serving as Principal Investigator for a project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, to examine the environmental correlates of walking in older population.


Anthony W. Schuman is a registered architect and associate professor at the New Jersey School of Architecture, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), where he presently serves as Acting Dean and Acting Graduate Program Director. He is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), which represents the 125 accredited schools of architecture in the U.S. and Canada. His articles on housing design and community development appear in ten books and numerous scholarly journals and conference proceedings. His writing has received awards from ACSA and the Society for American City and Regional Planning History. Tony was a founding member of a series of advocacy and activist organizations in the architecture and planning professions, including Urban Deadline, The Architects' Resistance (TAR), Homefront, and the Planners Network. He is past chair of the New York Chapter of Architects /Designers /Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR).


Sandra Vivanco has a teaching career spans the North American East and West, while her professional activity includes Japan, Perú, Portugal and Italy. She received a Master of Architecture with Honors from Columbia University and her undergraduate degree is from UC Berkeley. She has worked in Portugal for Alvaro Siza and in New York City for Kolatan MacDonald and Lynne Breslin. Since 1997, she is Associate Professor of Architecture and Cultural Diversity at California College of the Arts where her primary field of research is Latin American Modern Architecture, specifically the post war condition in Brazil. As a 2003 Fulbright fellow, she explored the role of gender in Peruvian Modernity as well as taught in the graduate architecture school at the Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería in Lima.

Sandra Vivanco's San Francisco based firm A+D, Architecture + Design is characterized by its constant investigation of modern city inhabitation. A+D is dedicated to promoting conscientious living through designs that heighten user-awareness of tectonic, environmental, and spatial quality. Community building is the focus of their work, supported by the belief that the application of architectural skills to the forum of affordable housing and education is a necessary step in fulfilling one's responsibility as a citizen. It has also become the inspiration and informant for much of what they do outside of public works, proving that design is at its most compelling when it is both sensitive and inclusive. The work of A+D has been featured in Domus, Custom Home, San Francisco Chronicle Magazine, Small Firms Great Projects and two recent books: San Francisco Modern Homes and San Francisco, A guide to Recent Architecture.


Beverly Willis FAIA is President of the Architecture Research Institute and the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation. She began her career as a multi-media artist, became a licensed architect in 1966, and was honored with a Fellowship by the American Institute of Architects in 1980. Her 35-person firm, Willis and Associates, Inc., has planned and designed projects located across the US. Her best-known building is the San Francisco Ballet Association Building and School in the San Francisco Civic Center. She founded the Architecture Research Institute in Manhattan in 1994 and closed her San Francisco based firm when she moved to New York. She was a Dartmouth College Montgomery Fellow in 1992 while she was writing her book Invisible Images - The Silent Language of Architecture, (National Building Museum, 1997). Her most recent papers include Towards a Sustainable City: Rebuilding Lower Manhattan in the book Future Forms and Design for Sustainable Cities, (Elsevier, Ltd. Oxford, 2005), and Towards a Sustainable City in the book City and Gender: International Discourse on Gender, Urbanism and Architecture, Leske+Budrich, Hanover, Germany 2003). She is a founding Trustee of the National Building Museum, Washington, DC. She is a past president of California Council American Institute of Architects, Golden Gate Chapter of Lambda Alpha and Chair of the Federal Construction Council, National Academy of Science, Washington, DC. Willis graduated from the University of Hawaii with a BFA degree in 1954. Mount Holyoke College awarded her an honorary doctorate in Fine Arts in 1984.


Mabel O. Wilson is an associate professor of architecture and visual criticism at CCA in San Francisco. She is also a partner in KW:a-an architectural design collaborative that engages in both speculative and built work. Her architectural designs have been shown at a number of international and national venues including the House Rules exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts, the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum's Triennial in 2003, and SF Cameraworks. She has had solo shows at the Storefront for Art and Architecture, 3A Garage, and Form Zero Gallery. KW:a was the recipient of a design distinction award from ID Magazine in 2002. Assemblage, Any Magazine, and Harvard Design Magazine have featured her articles and design projects. And her scholarly essays have appeared in books on critical geography and architecture. In 2002 she was the recipient of a Visiting Scholar Fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. She received a BS in architecture from University of Virginia, M. Arch from Columbia University and is currently a doctoral candidate in American Studies at New York University


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